Soup To Nuts: The NIH Proposal Process (Part Two)

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Today’s post is one in a series exploring the process of preparing and submitting an NIH proposal. 

Part I – Overview/Regular Research Grants

Regular Research (continued)

R21 – An “Exploratory” or “Developmental” grant is to encourage new activity in clinical, behavioral, or biomedical research that is still in its infancy of development, where the risk/reward potential is high.  Project periods for such awards are limited to three years and are not renewable, with a cap on direct costs of $275,000 for two years, and no more than $200,00 in direct costs in any one year.  Modular budgets are acceptable unless the applicant is a foreign entity, but not all NIH Institutes or Centers participate.

R13 – “Conference Grants” are just that: An award to support scientific meetings, conferences and workshops sponsored by the applicant, whether regional, national or international.  Because of the nature of the funded activities, the project period and related budget only have to be appropriate for the proposed conference.

R41/R42 – “Small Business Technology Transfer” (STTR) grants are to facilitate collaborative projects between research entities and small businesses.  In Phase I (R41), work is done to determine the value and feasibility of possible projects for commercialization, with funding capped at $100,000 for one year without renewal possibilities.  In Phase II (R42), the funds are used to actually develop the projects examined in Phase I, and here the cap is raised to $750,000 over a two-year period, with the potential renewal.

R43/R44 – “Small Business Innovation Research” (SBIR) grants are given directly to small business to assist them in developing products that may eventually be commercialized.  In Phase I (R43), work is done to determine the value and feasibility of possible projects for commercialization, with funding capped at $100,000 for six months without the opportunity for renewal.  In Phase II (R44), the funds are used to actually develop the projects examined in Phase I, and here the cap is raised to $750,000 over a two-year period, with the potential renewal.

 

Next time: Program Project and Center Grants