Understanding A-21 and Compliance

“Compliance” is one of those words that’s thrown around frequently within departments and research offices, but often lost in the shuffle is exactly why it is so important.  When you accept a sponsored award, your institution has the ethical and administrative responsibility to comply with all regulations, policies and guidance.  Compliance starts with YOU, but no single person should be solely responsible.   Remember, awards are made to institutions, not persons, so a team effort is required!

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Clear Up Your COEUS Proposal Type Confusion

As you’ve probably surmised by now, we have a love-hate relationship with COEUS, to the point where it is a regular subject on our corner of the internet.  While a vitally important cog in the pre-award process, it’s caused its fair share of gray hairs and “expletive deleted”s along the way.  One of the most confusing aspects of the program is the selection of Proposal Type, which determines work flow, submission requirements, and institutional reporting.  An incorrect proposal type creates a great deal of extra work down the road, and inaccurately reflects the financial status at the University.

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Why Compliance Matters (Hint: You Don’t Want To Be Exceptional)

The topic of budgetary and performance oversight on a funded research project is generally not high on the list of priorities for many research admin personnel.  So much time and energy is spent in the application phase that, when the Notice of Award finally does come through, the grants or contracts associate, as well as the department analyst, is already focusing on 19 other proposals.

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What Stanford v. Roche means for you

The disposition of Intellectual Property under federally-funded research is always one of the more complicated issues to explain to a private sponsor who adamantly believes that they are entitled to own everything that your school creates under a sponsored project.  Thankfully, the rights and obligations of non-profit and educational institutions are largely spelled out in the Bayh-Dole Act, which we discussed last November.  As we noted then, the Supreme Court decision in Stanford v. Roche became a defining case for the research community, and one that had Universities on the edges of their seats with respect to the ramifications on their own daily activities.  Coming up on the year anniversary of that 7-2 decision, we are still now evaluating how this decision fully affects those in the university arena.

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Sheldon’s Fun-day Friday

Sheldon’s Fun-day Friday

                This week was full of the post-birthday blues. If you’ve never partied like a rock star/sorority girl on your birthday you aren’t celebrating.  You’re simply eating cake, and you can do that any day.  So, to start to get over my post birthday blues, I was contemplating my next big adventure.  I mean, I’m long overdue for a vacation.

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Making Subagreements Easier!

Subrecipients are an integral part of the research process, and here at the Bloomberg ORA we process roughly one thousand subagreements each year alone.  By themselves, the subs would take up a substantial amount of our office’s time, but when you factor in the additional contracts, grants, MOUs and assorted other agreements that come across our desks, it’s easy to see why caffeine and baked goods are the staples of each of our diets.

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